US President Donald Trump signed a resolution passed by Congress that condemned white supremacist, hate groups and Neo-Nazis, after violence broke out in Charlottesville last month.

Last month, when a group of people were protesting against a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, a car was driven on them and one of the non-white protestor named Heather Heyer was killed. This act was deeply condemned by the entire nation and Congress overwhelmingly approved a resolution earlier this week, pushing Trump to sign on the resolution that was expressively condemning white supremacy. It also deeply condemned the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, last month and white nationalists, white supremacists, the Ku Klux Klan, neo-Nazis and other hate groups.

In response to that, the White House responded that Trump would ‘absolutely’ sign the Congressional Resolution. On Thursday Trump signed the resolution and said, “As Americans, we condemn the recent violence in Charlottesville and oppose hatred, bigotry, and racism in all forms. No matter the colour of our skin or our ethnic heritage, we all live under the same laws, we all salute the same great flag, and we are all made by the same almighty God.” The resolution strongly opposes hatred and intolerance among people of America.

The passage if resolution text meant that Trump would have likely had any attempted presidential veto overturned. Initially after the Charlottesville incident, Trump was criticised for his response to that deadly act of violence, in which he condemned bigotry and violence “on many sides.”. But after signing, he added that he was ‘please to sign’ it and was against such violence in all forms. Sadly, racism and intolerance isn’t just an American problem, rather it is a little better in America that their President is signing resolutions against such crime. Whereas in rest of the world, vileness persists – the fine day when we humans will behave like humans, that would be the day when we will live in peace; and we anticipate that day more than anything.

1689